Full Assurance of Faith

With the best of intentions, mistakes will be made, because men are but fallible. But to the Christian the firm assurance is given: "There is none like unto the God of Jeshrun, who rideth upon the heaven in thy help, and in his excellency on the sky. The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms." Deuteronomy 33:26, 27. His power is shown in creation. The things that he has made attest his eternal power and Godhead. The more powerful the government, the greater the confidence in it. Then what more reasonable than that we should have implicit confidence in the God whom nature and revelation combined, declare to be omnipotent, eternal, and unchangeable?

If I should express to an infidel my doubts as to the integrity of one of his friends, he would say: "That's because you don't know him; just try him, and you will find him as true as steel." This would be a fair reply; and so we say to the infidel who doubts the promises of God: "O taste and see that the Lord is good; . . . there is no want to them that fear him." Psalm 34:8, 9. What right has anybody to doubt God, since everybody is testing his power and goodness every moment of his life? In the first chapter of second Corinthians, verses 18-20, we find the following positive statements: "But as God is true, our word toward you was not yea and nay. For the Son of God, Jesus Christ, who was preached among you by us, even by me and Sylvanus and Timotheus, was not yea and nay, but in him was yea. For all the promises of God in him are yea, and in him amen, unto the glory of God by us."

In this Fact alone can the sinner find any confidence in approaching to God. "Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, and today, and forever," is the sinner's only hope. It is not to taunt them, nor to glory in disappointing them, that the gracious call is given to men. "Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price." Isaiah 55:1.

Says Jesus, "Him that cometh to me I will in nowise cast out" (John 6:37); and Paul says that "He is able to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by Him" (Hebrews 7:25). And the same apostle also says:—

"Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need." Hebrews 4:14-16.

Again we read: "But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him." Hebrews 11:6. Faith, then, and boldness are characteristics that the Lord wants those to manifest who come to him. These thoughts were suggested by the reading of an old hymn, the first three stanzas of which are as follows:—

"Come humble sinner, in whose breast
A thousand thoughts revolve;
Come with your guilt and fear oppressed,
And make this last resolve:

"I'll go to Jesus, though my sins
Like mountains round me close;
I know his courts, I'll enter in,
Whatever may oppose.

"Prostrate I'll lie before his throne,
And there my guilt confess;
I'll tell him I'm a wretch undone
Without his sovereign grace."

That is good; no better resolve could possibly be made; it is just what God wants every sinner to do.